LegacyStories.org

LEGACY MATTERS! PASS IT ON!

Bring your legacy stories to life
with our complimentary tools and resources

Write and discriminately share legacy stories in your personal or family story blog.

Curate and organize your legacy photos and view them in shareble slide shows.

Record your Legacy stories to build an oral history in pictures, including old audios.

X

Now you can write, organize, preserve and share legacy stories with your personal or family Story Blog. You can create unlimited chapters and post unlimited content to your Legacy Story Blog.

This is the ideal way to document your heirloom recipes, family traditions, legacy letters, poetry, wishes for the future, wisdom statements, life lessons, values and legacy stories.

Write legacy stories about your ancestors, childhood, marriage and family, education and career, military experience, faith and spirituality, special memories and more.

Our multi-media editor makes it easy and comes with a full suite of features, many not found anywhere else. All you have to do is "reminisce with purpose" and....

  • use our story prompts as memory triggers to recall important milestones, defining moments and important people in your life
  • create multiple life chapters for your story posts
  • drag and drop chapters and posts to sequentially arrange by life stage, chronologically or otherwise
  • add dimension to your stories with photos and embedded audios and videos
  • discriminately share each story with five different audiences; private, family, friends, family and friends, our contribute to our public library
  • link stories about ancestors to over 12 billion records in FamilySearch, the official family tree of humankind
  • convert story posts to .pdf to print and save.
  • share stories on popular social media platforms
  • build a following of subscribers to interact with your Legacy Story Blog
X

Before the digital revolution, families saved an average of 3,000 photos in albums and shoe boxes, many representing the visual record of life-defining moments, milestones and special people. Today we are drowning in an ocean of digital images.

Gone are the days when grandchildren turned the album pages to learn about their elders. It is unreasonable to believe they will take the time to sift through tens of thousands of your photos to find the important ones, those that can give them a sense of who they are and what life was like in your time.

Our Legacy Slide Show component is a sanctuary where you can curate, preserve and share your highest-priority "legacy photos" in a format that helps future generations learn about their family history.If used for photos alone, your free Legacy Portfolio (1GB) has enough storage capacity for about 5,000 vintage family photos (who needs that many anyhow?)

With our Legacy Slide Show component you can......

  • create unlimited photo albums to organize and view slide shows.
  • drag and drop photos inside slide show albums to appear chronologically or otherwise.
  • use your computer microphone to record your voice while describing the story behind the photo
  • discriminately share each photo with five audiences: Private, family, friends, family and friends, our contribute to our public library.
  • link ancestor photos to over 12 billion records in FamilySearch, the official Family Tree of humankind
  • share your Legacy Slides Shows on popular social media platforms
X

When it comes to telling legacy stories, the spoken word is incomparable. And when you combine a legacy photo with a recorded audio narration, you get the best of both worlds by preserving the image and capturing your voice, personality, dialect and attitude.

In our Audio component you can upload, organize and share oral history recordings that are created by our free Legacy Stories IOS or Android mobile app. The app takes a picture of the teller, an artifact or a vintage photo then records the teller's voice while reminiscing. Or, you can record without a photo altogether while answering some of the app's 200+ legacy questions. In our Audio component you can also upload, preserve and share your vintage recordings that have been digitized from old cassettes, reel-to-reels or 8-track audio tapes, etc.

Now, all your priceless audio recordings of childhood memories, recitals, family skits, music, lectures and more can be brought to life again and shared with family and friends.Each recording can be discriminately shared with five different audiences; private, family, friends, family and friends, or you can share it with the world in our public library.

It's rare to find a secure place online to preserve and share your audio recordings, but now you can add these valuable oral histories to your legacy portfolio and...

  • create multiple albums to organize recordings by life events
  • drag and drop recording tracks to display chronologically or otherwise
  • discriminately share each individual recording, keep private or contribute to our public library.
  • automatically notify subscribing friends and family when new recordings are uploaded

Read an excerpt of Don Carriker's legacy story about his wife.

  • “A truly fulfilling and enriching experience!”
  • "I’ve been meaning to tell my story for years and I am loving every minute. My Family too! ”
  • "I am so thankful that I found this site. No more excuses to tell my life story!”
  • "My mother was just diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and we are frantically recording her stories. Thank you so much!”
  • "I have introduced my clients to this site and it has completely changed my relationship with the family."

Listen to a story by Gail Sheehy who pays tribute to her husband.

X
The Twain DID Meet
Don Carriker

A few days after meeting a very attractive young lady at the Chicago USO on the 4th of July weekend, 1954, I pulled her phone number out of my pocket.  “Anne DeNicolo” was the name above the telephone number. As I stood by the wall-mounted pay phone in the Fifth Army Band barracks I pictured her in my mind – a dark brunette girl with deep brown eyes, a soft feminine voice and a petite attractively well-proportioned figure. Her mannerisms had radiated propriety: Not the sort of girl to casually date a soldier who was far from home and of unknown “breeding.” 

So I was prepared to hear her say that while our Sunday afternoon at the USO had been nice she wasn’t interested in anything further.   But that picture I held of her in my mind goaded me.  She was worth gambling with my pride.

I had been rather humiliated and hurt in a couple of previous dating experiences. My “first love,” when I was a senior in high school, had worn my class ring around her neck for a couple of months - just long enough to let me believe I had finally “broken the barrier” and entered the realm of “guys who had girls.” A few weeks later she gave the ring back to me and, using that phrase girls must learn right after saying “ma-ma” while milk drools down their chin, said, “We can still be friends." A few years later when I was a junior in college another girl let me believe she was interested in me – so much so that I drove 140 miles from my college room a few times to date her. The last time I made that drive and knocked on her door to take her out her mother answered and said, “Oh, Margie went out on a date with Bob Miller tonight……….”

X
Clay Sheehy Tribute
Gail Sheehy

FEATURED PARTNERS